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Residents In This Section

Curriculum by Year

PGY 1

The integrated PGY 1 year encompasses time in Surgery and Urology. There are 13 – 4 week rotations  incorporating  8 -9 rotations  of general surgery and surgical specialties and 3- 4 rotations of urology. This schedule is coordinated with the general surgery program to ensure an adequate base of the care of surgical patients can be obtained.

Sample rotations for PGY 1

VA Surgery Colorectal ICU Gen Surg
Acute Care
Surg Oncology Urology  
Plastic Surgery Gen Surgery
Night Emergency
Trauma
Urology ICU Urology Thoracic Urology
 
The Block Diagram for the remaining 4 years of Urology is:
PGY 2 PGY 3 PGY 4 PGY 5
DHMC Junior Elective/Research VAMC Chief Resident DHMC A Urologic Oncology and Laparoscopy
DHMC Transplant Urology / CHaD Pediatric Urology DHMC A Urologic Oncology and Laparoscopy Concord Hospital Urology DHMC B General Urology, Endourology, and Female Urology
DHMC Junior Concord Hospital Urology VAMC Chief Resident DHMC Chief Resident
DHMC Junior DHMC B General Urology, Endourology, and Female Urology DHMC Transplant Urology / CHaD Pediatric Urology DHMC Chief Resident

Listed below is a general overview of each year. The skills, objectives and responsibilities of each year of the residency are published in Med-Hub and distributed at the beginning of the year and prior to each rotation.

Second year

Second-year residents rotate through all of the three clinical services at DHMC. Continuity of care occurs by seeing new patients in clinic, operating on and caring for the same patient post-op, and then seeing patients return to clinic for follow-up. Every three months they rotate to another team. During the pediatric block, residents also participate with the transplant team. While assigned to a particular team, residents attend clinic and operate with the team's attending’s.

During the pediatric urology block, the resident spends a half-day per week going to transplant clinic, where they are involved in the workup of new patients and the follow-up of patients on whom they have operated. They participate in donor nephrectomy and in transplantation, particularly the neocystotomy.

Third year

Third-year residents rotate through both adult urology services at DHMC for 3 months each, rotates in Concord for 3 months, and has a 3 month elective block. Electives have typically included protected block for supervised research, although other electives at approved sites may be pursued after discussion with the program director. Electives could consist of Men's Health, radiation oncology, interventional radiology, FPMRS with Gyn, or other rotations.

During the three-month rotation in Concord, residents work with nine attending’s. As in other locations, care is taken to ensure that continuity of care occurs by having the resident see patient in the ER or as consults, in addition to operating. An overarching goal is for the resident to gain additional expertise in a private-practice setting in both inpatient and outpatient care at Concord Urology and Concord Hospital.

Fourth year

Fourth-year residents rotate in pediatrics and transplant, at the VA, and in Concord. As before, the resident has increased responsibility assigned to them each time they rotate on a service.

While assigned to a particular team, residents attend clinic and operate with the attending’s. Continuity of care occurs by seeing new patients in clinic, operating on patients and caring for them post-op, and then seeing patients return to clinic for follow-up.

Residents spend six months at the VA, overseeing the inpatient and outpatient urology service there. The resident is the operating surgeon under supervision on all cases.   Fourth year residents do a three-month rotation in Concord, where they work with nine  attending’s. As in other locations, care is taken to ensure that continuity of care occurs by having the resident see patient in the ER or as consults, in addition to operating.

Fifth year: Chief Resident

Fifth-year residents rotate at DHMC for twelve months, with six months as the administrative chief resident. Attending’s give the chief resident increased responsibility in caring for patients. The administrative  chief resident is responsible for the entire service. Although residents may be assigned to teams during certain rotations, the chief resident will oversee the assignment of cases to ensure that cases are assigned to an appropriate-level resident while still allowing junior residents to have some participation in complex cases.

The resident is ideally the operating surgeon under supervision on the most complex cases. Continuity of care occurs by seeing new patients in clinic, operating on patients and caring for them post-op, and then seeing patients return to clinic for follow-up.

 

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