Neonatal/Perinatal Fellowship

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Aerial view of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock campus

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center offers a three-year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited fellowship in neonatal-perinatal medicine. The goal of our program is to provide the necessary training to develop excellent clinicians and future leaders in neonatology.

Fellows participate in a variety of learning experiences, scholarly activities, and hands-on patient care, which includes clinical time in the Intensive Care Nursery (ICN) at the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock (CHaD). There are usually two to three fellows in the program at any given time. Because of the small nature of our program, fellows have the chance to create and foster strong relationships with mentors and faculty. Fellows are key members of the division and able to have long-lasting impacts on the unit and community. With engaged faculty and flexible scheduling, fellow education and opportunities are prioritized.

The Intensive Care Nursery at CHaD is the only tertiary academic referral center for New Hampshire and south-central Vermont for high-risk obstetric and neonatal patients. There are approximately 450 admissions to the ICN each year. Fellows learn from a variety of medical and surgical patients with a vast array of routine and complex diagnoses. Fellows also gain experiences in rural perinatal care, graduate and undergraduate medical education, and cross departmental collaboration. And as long-standing active member of The Vermont Oxford Network, fellows can take part in and lead impactful quality improvement projects.

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Neonatal and Perinatal fellows at DHMC
Some of Dartmouth-Hitchcock's neonatal/perinatal fellows.

Our history

The Intensive Care Nursery was founded by the determination and dedication of AAP Apgar Award winner, Dr. George Little. Dr. Little was a pioneer in neonatology. He was the first neonatologist in the state of New Hampshire and one of the first committee members of the section on Perinatal Pediatrics. He saw a need in the community and created the system of care for sick neonates from the ground up. He would later become the Chair of the Department of Maternal and Child Health at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

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Dr. George Little in nursery with mother
Dr. George Little in the nursery.

Through his forward thinking the ICN has prioritized family centered care since its inception. He understood the importance of families as collaborators in the health of their infants. Additionally, he appreciated how to integrate a complex tertiary care unit into a rural area. This culture continues with the ICN’s strong emphasis on working in partnership with parents and the community to optimize the health of the infants.

Dr. Little is now an emeritus professor of Pediatrics and of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. He remains actively involved in neonatal Global Health work through the AAP’s Helping Babies Breathe.